The Land Lawyers Blog

Community Development Authorities Article Published by University of Richmond Law Review

by on December 16, 2010

The article, appearing in the most recent edition of the University of Richmond Law Review, was written by Andrew A. Painter, an associate at Walsh, Colucci, Lubeley, Emrich, and Walsh, P.C., and explores Community Development Authorities (“CDAs”), including an overview of their history, legal structure, process, and use across the Commonwealth. Virginia’s local governments are […]

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Significant Changes Proposed For PWC Environment Chapter

by on November 12, 2010

Pete Dolan pdolan@pw.thelandlawyers.com The Prince William Board of County Supervisors (BOCS) is scheduled to review changes that would overhaul the Environment Chapter of the County’s Comprehensive Plan at a public hearing on December 7, 2010. The BOCS will have two versions of the draft Chapter to consider: one prepared by County Planning staff and a […]

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DCSM Revisions – New Landscaping Requirements

by on November 12, 2010

Pete Dolan pdolan@pw.thelandlawyers.com The Prince William County Planning Commission held a public hearing on November 3, 2010 and voted to recommend to the BOCS approval of changes to the DCSM landscaping requirements as prepared by County staff. The changes would increase the amount of plantings required in buffers and landscape strips without increasing required widths. […]

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Revisions to the Stafford County Comprehensive Plan

by on November 12, 2010

Stafford County is currently undertaking a major Comprehensive Plan update, which includes the designation of eight Urban Development Areas (UDAs) and four redevelopment areas. The next Planning Commission public hearing is scheduled for November 17, 2010 and the Board of Supervisors hearing is scheduled for December 12, 2010. The anticipated designation of UDAs is expected […]

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Development authorities need a look in recession

by on September 13, 2010

No one knows how the commonwealth’s dire $4.5 billion budget shortfall dilemma will be resolved, but it is likely that the General Assembly will again shift a significant portion of the state’s budgetary woes to local governments, effectively forcing them to raise local taxes to pay for education, public safety and social services. This year’s […]

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